Tag Archives: chasing Italy

bitcoin

Paralelní Polis, a Bitcoin Kavárna

Hubby doesn’t often ask to go check out a place so when he does, we go. The latest place he wanted to try was Paralelní Polis (Parallel Polis), a Bitcoin kavárna (coffee house). I was slightly pessimistic about it because a place that only takes Bitcoin. Really? The idea of coffee and chocolate cake got me over my slight pessimism.  So on a Saturday, when we both had a little time, we went on another Prague adventure. It’s always an adventure going somewhere new in Prague. Actually I’d past this unique coffee joint several times and never knew it. It’s kind of unassuming from the outside. Fairly modern in a less than modern section of Prague. It doesn’t scream at you from across the street either. Like some other coffee places with green and white signs.
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We walk in and it’s a nice space. Open and welcoming but not like your average place. There’s no counter. No apron-ed barista smiling, greeting and waiting dutifully at a register. So far so good. I like different. There’s a menu on the post. There’s cakes on display in a small fridge. There’s a large island with an espresso machine, cups, plates, and other things. A young woman comes up to help us and we ask if she speaks English. She does. Good because we don’t speak a lot of Czech and what we do know won’t get us through a conversation easily. She asks if we have a Bitcoin wallet. We do. And we’re in business.

We order coffee drinks and a piece of chocolate coconut cake to share. We take a seat and enjoy the surroundings. At the time they weren’t busy but they definitely could be. I find the Wi-Fi password and take some pictures. Our drinks arrive but we have to wait a few extra minutes for the cake. Since we’ve come in a few other people have come in after us. to order and get their coffee. Two young ladies that are in a hurry don’t stay because this isn’t the sort of place you run into to grab quick coffee. Another person is being walked through the Bitcoin purchase on the machine in the corner. You don’t have Bitcoin, no worries, you can purchase some on the spot.
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Our cake arrives a few minutes later. I really wish I’d taken a picture. It was delicious. I ate the coconut bits while hubby stuck to more of the chocolate and cookie like crust. The drinks were yummy. Hubby is still getting used to coffee. He likes filter coffee more than espresso but he really enjoyed the cake.

So this is a place we’ll  come back to. It’s a bit far from our flat but another day another adventure in Prague.

https://www.paralelnipolis.cz/bitcoin-coffee-en/

Try it out and tell me what you think.

chocolate

Chocolate Coffee Heaven

So you might think that I would’ve found Chocolate Coffee heaven in Costa Rica. After all, that is where the grow some of the best coffee and chocolate. And they do have some awesome coffee and organic chocolate (if you can find it, since most of it seems to be exported.) Alas, I had to wait until I was in central Europe not central America to find chocolate coffee heaven. It is located in a wonderful little place called Choco Cafe U Cervene Zidle (Choco Cafe at the Red Chair, Liliova 4/250, Prague, Czech Republic).
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When I first arrived in Prague a friend of mine from the states informed me she had a friend in Prague that she wanted to introduce me to. This friend is who I refer to in other posts as my favorite transplanted Texan (FTT). She has been in the Czech Republic on and off for about 12 years. After introducing ourselves on line we met in person a few weeks later. (Hubby and I were trying to find a flat, get adjusted to lower fall (not Costa Rica) temperatures, interview for jobs, etc) FTT and I planned on meeting at this pleasant little cafe. It was an adventure for me because I was still getting used to transit in Prague and I hadn’t done a lot of it on my own. I was being a wimp and going with hubby everywhere. This time I met with FTT near a tram stop and took a short walk to the cafe.

She had told me about Choco Cafe briefly and I was fairly excited to: 1. Have some chocolate (I was in dire need of chocolate at the time) 2. Have some coffee or cappuccino or even a straight I.V. of caffeine. 3. Have some girl time. I had been spending a lot of time with my boys and need less testosterone. As we walked a few blocks we talked a little but mostly I was getting to know my surroundings. She explained a few things and one thing I found most interesting was Bethlehem chapel. Jan Hus’ old stomping grounds.

Down the street and around the corner lies a sweet little cafe attached to the U Cervene Zidle Hotel (Red Chair Hotel). We had not made a reservation but lucked out because it was the middle of the afternoon. It still had plenty of patrons. Mothers with small children, couples, students, and ladies like us looking for some chocolate indulgence. Now you could get a regular cappuccino and quiche or you can go crazy.
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I went crazy I ordered the Choco Cafe (chocolate coffee) and the Cokoladovy (chocolate cake). My friend FTT ordered the Choco Cafe and 2 makronky (macaroons). The macaroons are delicious looking. But I needed chocolate fix. And I so got one.

Although I loved this place I didn’t think my husband would be into it. One day, a couple weeks later, I wanted to show him both the cafe and the chapel. So I brought him here because I knew he’d like the choco cafe. He ordered a panini and I got the quiche. Absolutely to die for. You should go here any day of the week, reservations are needed for the busy times. All the popular places take reservations. And whether you need a chocolate caffeine fix or you just want to hang in a pleasant atmosphere with a friend or hubby and enjoy the moment, this is the place.

By the way, they sell chocolate too. Lovely bars of chocolate. Dark, lavender, milk. Fancy. Less fancy.
Choco Cafe

Strange but True (or Crazy Similarities: CR and CZ )

This is a strange but true segment of Chasing Italy. Outside of the obvioius fact that our first two stops are in Costa Rica (CR) and the Czech Republic (CZ because CR was already taken), there are some crazy similarities between the two countries we’ve decided to explore.  Climate is vastly different both in temperature and in the social arena. Costa Rica is laid back, we’ll get there when we get there attitude. Pura Vida. The Czech Republic,  at least in Prague, is as efficient as it can be and a rising star in the world of business. Since the Velvet Revolution in 1989 and the separation of Czech Republic and Slovakia in 1992 business from Europe and North America are coming into Prague. Costa Rica is full of expats and retirees. When you walk in Costa Rica,  you stroll. When you walk in Czech Republic, you stride. Quickly. Making sure to catch the next metro or tram. It’s go, go, go.

Here’s a short list of similarities:

1. No dryers. Okay there are dryers but the majority of households don’t have them. Why? Cost. Energy is expensive. In Costa Rica everyone uses a laundry line on their porch or close by their house. It’s 32 degrees and above year round in most areas of Costa Rica. Why spend money when nature is willing to do the work for free.
In Czech Republic you use drying racks or lines inside or outside, depending on the weather. Some people have lines on their balconies. Some even use a rack that attaches outside their window several stories up. I’m not comfortable having my unmentionables hanging out a window but people do it. Czechs are very efficient and don’t think dryers are a necessity. You get used to it. And you plan accordingly because laundry for four takes time.

2. Mildew. Mildew is bad in CR during the wet or rainy season. It’s no fun to hang out your clothes in the morning and at the end of the day they’re still damp. Damp and warm are mildew best friends. You have to be careful with damp clothes. Don’t leave them on the floor overnight they’ll get nasty fast. Hang it up. Air it out.
I never knew mildew would be an issue in CZ. Some of the older building (and Prague has tons of older buildings) have lousy insulation and air circulation.  I’m specifically talking about the blocks of flats. Huge monstrosities built in mid twentieth century to house the masses. It’s a constant fight in the bathrooms and around the windows. Moisture, moisture, moisture. And since it’s been a warm wet winter and we have an exterior wall we must keep dry and free of mildew. Chlorinated spray is my best friend nowadays. It sucks but it works and it works fast.

3. Dogs. CR has dogs. Lots of them. Generally they are strays and not fixed and randomly reproduce like dogs do. The best dogs we found were in Samara. Very laid back happy dogs for the most part. They roamed relatively freely and yet knew to not enter homes, restaurants,  and most stores. Our neighbors dog liked to follow us and even did some body surfing with us at the beach. (There are free roaming horses as well but that’s a different post). Other dogs in other places in CR were not as well behaved. We often heard stories about people getting attacked and some people taking revenge on the dogs. It’s sad. A lot of expats try and help by adopting dogs and caring for strays with medical care and spaying or neutering. That is awesome of them. Though most Ticos think Americans are crazy for it.
In CZ, there are dogs a plenty. Big ones, little ones. Ones with just collars but well groomed and ones with sweaters which are adorable. I haven’t seen strays though. I’m sure there are some out there. Most dogs are cherished and very obedient.  People walk their dogs off leash a lot of the time. Dogs though not overly friendly but  are very well behaved. Not straying too far from their people and returning when called. People are seen playing fetch and walking them daily. It makes me happy to see happy dogs and the people who love them.

4. Beer. Yes, beer. Beer in CR is cheap and plentiful. Two national beers and under 80 cents a bottle when you turn in your bottles. Yep, you pay extra for bottles but when you bring them in you pay less. They use them over and over. So remember to bring in your bottles and you’ll get a better price.
The micro brewery phenomenon is just getting started in CR. Expats are starting up microbrewery companies and it’s becoming more lucrative to be in the microbrewery business. Since CR is in tourism business it’s good to give them what they want and what they’ll pay for. They have a saying there though “CR where they make easy hard”. Hopefully human ingenuity wins over human greed.
The Czech Republic is largest consumer of beer in the world. Beer is cheaper than soda or water in most restaurants. You still need to turn in your old bottles to get the best price but beer is sold in half liters and for about 65 cents a bottle. Not bad when you like beer. (They have wine too. Don’t dispair.) Most beer consumed is about 4%. People drink a beer with lunch. A beer at lunch is not unheard of and totally normal. People don’t drink to get drunk they just have a beer and go on. It’s just a cultural norm.

5. Discoteques. Both countries have discoteques. For dancing.  If you want to go dancing then you must go to a discoteque not a nightclub like in the U.S. Nightclubs are for drinking and meeting/picking up people. So if you need to get your groove on go to a discoteque in Costa Rica or the Czech Republic.

6. Orchids. Costa Rica is a tropical paradise full of exotic birds, lizards, flowers, etc. I’m told that you can go into the jungle and find orchids. Then sell them for profit. I’m not certain about this but it sounds reasonable.
Praguers love their orchids. They do very well here even with lower temperatures and less light, this far north and in the winter. Must be the moisture. My landlady left one and it’s growing like crazy. About to bloom any day now. Maybe on New Years.
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7. Wrap arounds or Sarongs/Scarves. If you live near the beach in Costa Rica and you’re a woman, you will collect sarongs and you will have coordinating bathing suits, flip flops and sarongs.  A rainbow of colors and designs await you. They make awesome cover ups,  tablecloths, towels, or picnic blankets. If I’d stayed any longer I would have bought more but alas I left for greener pastures.
Those greener pastures are in the center of Europe. Scarves are a necessity is central Europe in the autumn and winter. I have seen the same ability to coordinate scarves, leggings. Prague women love a good scarf. And scarves are awesome. They keep you cosy from wind that comes barreling down metro tunnels or off the river while waiting for your tram . Women collect them to go with outfits and seasons and just cause they’re pretty.
It’s not much of a stretch but women in both countries love their colorful wrap around bits of cloth.
I plan on starting my collection soon. I’ve heard of a shop that’ll give you a great deal of you buy more than one.

8. Music From The 80s And 90s. Costa Rica loves late twentieth century American/British rock and roll. They also love late twentieth century action flicks. And I mean LOVE. On the radio everywhere. Things I haven’t heard for 20 years. It was like reliving my youth but where the roads were questionable and the weather unbearably hot. A bit like August in Nelson county Virginia circa 1990. They also love reggae but that’s a different story.
We’d thought we’d escaped the trip down musical memory lane when we came to Europe. In fact, we’d stepped into a different kind of time warp. Not only do we get to listen late twentieth century rock and roll but additionally get to listen newer uncensored lyrical musings from newer artists. I was flabbergasted when shopping at the market and heard Eminem spouting awesome yet graphic rhymes overhead. Dropping the F bombs left and right. Yet I get to relive my youth with the non sensical musical arrangements of Czech radio. Everything from Four Non Blondes and Michael Jackson to Eminem and Taylor Swift.

9. Chau and Čao. Greetings. One of the first things you learn to say is hello in the local language. When we went to CR we learned and practiced saying Buenos (short for Buenos Dias) or Buena (Buena noches). This is the common greeting in the land of Pura Vida. Once you get to know someone you can use the more familiar and say chau. It’s like the Italian version ciao. There are a lot of Italians on the Pacific side of Costa Rica and this is where chau is used. Coincidence, I think not.
In CZ, specifically Prague (so far that’s all we know of CZ), people greet each all the time. In the hall, the elevator, and in restaurants, bars, and stores. The proper greeting is dobry den. It means good day literally. The same as in Spanish and many other languages. Once you become more familiar or friendly with your new Czech friend you can greet one of two ways. Ahoj or čao. Both are familiar and utilized equally. It’s preference of the speaker. Čao (like its Italian counterpart) be used as in greetings or farewells. Often it’s used as čao čao when saying bye. The first time someone used this with me I felt like I’d been accepted into the in crowd but that’s probably a bit of an exaggeration. There are a lot of Italian influences in Prague from food to coffee. Is the use of čao a coincidence? Hmmm. You decide.

10. Beautiful women. Okay every country has beautiful women. The women of CR and CZ aren’t afraid to own it. Ticas (Costa Rican women) like to wear revealing outfits. After all, it is the beach and swimsuits are revealing but when the go out to discoteques or dinner, also like to wear figure flattering clothes. Sometimes too figure flattering. Low cut tops, short shorts, skin tight jeans, and high heels. Men love this and I appreciate their ability to dress so freely but a little modesty wouldn’t hurt either.
We moved to Prague just as the weather changed to cooler temperatures. This has not stopped the women of Prague from wearing the shortest skirts I have ever seen. In fact, at times I think they seem to be wearing long shirts and not skirts. My least favorite female fashion statement is the winter coat that is longer than the super short skirt. To me it looks like they’re wearing boots, hosiery, and just a coat. (My least favorite male fashion statement is skinny jeans but that’s another post.)
I hear that when warmer temperatures of the spring and summer come, the more cleavage will be shown. I’m sure men can’t wait but personally I can. Not to be a prude but a little modesty goes a long way. Wait, I think I already said that.

11. Shoes off at the door. It’s a necessity in Costa Rica to take off your flip flops before entering your home. Otherwise you will track in sand. Then you will have to deal with the woman of the house. I have threatened dismemberment over tracked in sand so I completely understand.
It’s the cultural norm to remove your shoes when entering a household in the Czech Republic. In fact it is highly frowned upon to leave your shoes. Czechs think it quite rude. I believe that Czechs take pride in their homes whether it’s a flat in a block of flats or something more eclectic. Often you might be offered slippers for walking about the house. Take them or not but please remove your shoes.

So there you have it. The similarities between Costa Rica  and the Czech Republic.  Strange but true.

mind

How Not to Lose Your Fracking Mind (My Family is the A-Team)

In my mind my family are like the characters of the A-Team. Well, sort of. And moving from the States to Costa Rica to Czech Republic with teenagers is not for the faint of heart or the weak of mind. It seems best to approach life with a bit of humor or you will lose your fracking mind. Or at least your patience. Moving in general is a nerve wracking experience. Try getting rid of almost everything, twice.

Give me a minute, I’m good. Give me an hour, I’m great. Give me six months, I’m unstoppable. COL. Hannibal Smith, A-Team. I like the colonel.  In our family my hubby is the colonel. He’s the one with a plan. I’d follow the colonel anywhere. I’ve proven that and will continue to follow him. I trust his abilities.

How Not to Lose Your Fracking Mind While Moving Around the World with Teenagers

1. Save the Legos and other childhood memories. When I was frantically packing and purging I felt like I would lose my mind. There were things I wanted to keep. Boys toys, books, and memories. I was pressed to make decisions fast. Although I had a few months to clear out the clutter nothing really happened until we were down to the wire on time. I had to step it up. I got rid of kitchen things I thought I’d keep. I got rid of clothes we or the boys  might need later. There were a lot of things I might need later. I wouldn’t need them in Costa Rica but everything could fail and I’d need them in the States. I wasn’t trusting in the calling. I was making back up plans. Then, when pressed I decided to keep what was not replaceable. Books, art, memories, kid stuff, and a few heirlooms. I purged like crazy. Got rid of linens, kitchen ware, etc. Etc. Etc. I let it go but I saved the Legos and other childhood memorabilia. One day my children will thank me.

2. Legos Rules but so do handmade gifts and books Those things I couldn’t part with. Quilts my mom made. Art and books that I’d collected. Legos that my son collected. School projects from my kids. I got rid of a lot of fluff but when it came down to it I imagined my grandchildren. I thought about things that I’d want to pass down to them. This made the decision easier. Hopefully I’ll have grandchildren some day and I’ll have things connected to memories to share with them.

I see my oldest son in the role of B.A. Baraccass. B.A. has a good heart but a bad attitude. He follows orders and has a gruff way of expressing himself. My son is a 16 year old grumpy yet lovable walking hormone machine. About 80% of the time his attitude isn’t good. Moody yet vulnerable. Total teenager. One day he’ll come back to me. Normalize I hope.

3. It’s all crap. Okay mostly crap. Seriously you don’t need all those things that are stuffed into corners and forgotten.  Rule of thumb if it’s broken, toss it (or recycle). If it doesn’t fit, give it away. If you don’t use it, give it away. Clutter will wear you out. Clearing out the clutter is more than cleaning it’s liberating. It’s life affirming.  It’s powerful. It’s totally awesome.

My younger son is Mad Dog Murdoch. No he doesn’t suffer from an mental issues like Murdoch but he is kind of crazy but crazy talented. He’s willing to put himself on YouTube and create awesome videos. He’s so creative and yet not quite like the rest of society. He’s handsome, crazy talented, and a little different.

4. Seriously, if you don’t like it or wear it, toss it. You need clothes. Clothes that look good on you and that you feel good about. Everything else can go to someone else. You need cleaning products but you don’t need gallons and gallons. If you don’t use it regularly, don’t buy it. If you clean like a mad woman and go through lots then buy lots. Otherwise buy what you need at the best price and use it. Think twice about purchases. Will you use it? How often? Is it worth it?

Face. The last character in the A-Team. I’m not gorgeous but I do like to talk. I’d say I am the most outgoing talker in our group. The extrovert. Getting myself into trouble by not thinking every through. Face is who you send in to do the talking. Most days that me, able to talk to anyone, anywhere. I don’t lie very well.

In all honesty, my hubby and I switch roles on occasion. Sometimes I’m the leader of the group but sometimes I sport a bad attitude or crazy ideas. So, in a way, we are each the leader, the face, the bad attitude, and the crazy one.

5. Take what you need. Need what you take. Get rid of the superfluous. In the end when you’ve reduced, given away, and gotten rid of things you discover it’s really not about the stuff. People and memories you make with those people are what matters. See and do things with your family and friends. Take pictures and write a blog. Share laughs and love. Make memories.  When you leave this world the memories are what they are left with. Make them good.

What do you think? Could get rid of 90 percent of everything, move across the world, and have an adventure of a lifetime?

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The road less traveled. Will you?

My Favorite Restaurants In Sámara (or Where You Should Eat)

We were in Sámara for a mere month. Our goal was to attend TEFL school to get certified to teach English.  It was an intensive four week course and we passed with flying colors. In our down time on weekends or occasional evenings we would often find ourselves, sometimes with kids and sometimes with new friends, at one of many restaurants in this quaint but quirky little town. Here are my favorite restaurants in Sámara.

1. Bar Arriba: This fun restaurant has the best french fries in Sámara. My kids also enjoyed the chicken strips as well. Although they are family oriented during lunch and dinner it is a fun place to hang out watch a soccer match and have a beer or four. They have a ladies night on Tuesday and often have live music or a DJ to keep it lively. Most of the drinking crowd starts after nine so bringing the kids here for dinner isn’t too chaotic.  The hamburger is the best in town. (Some say the veggie burger at Luv Burger rules but I’m saying as far as beef burgers go, this is the place.) You can find them on FB at Bar Arriba.

2. Falafel Cafe: This was my go to for fast and fresh lunch. In Costa Rica a fast lunch isn’t always possible which is good when you’re on vacation but not when you’ve got a designated hour for lunch. Falafeño or the Tabbouleh plate are excellent choices. Hubby got tired of going here too many times in a row but admitted to it being an awesome little place to get a quick bite. It’s also fairly cheap and filling for this tourist town. You can locate them in the Nature Center part of town. You can find them on FB at Falafel Cafe.

3. Coco’s Mexican: This is a great little place to celebrate with family and friends. They serve typical Mexican fair which, being from Colorado, we crave from time to time. They also serve large margaritas during happy hour. When we finished class at Costa Rica TEFL this was where we went to get our relaxation on. They have happy hour specials like everyone else in town but they have Mexican food and tequila which was a major selling point for the hubby and myself. Kurt really enjoyed the Chimichanga and the Chicken Nachos were excellent. As with all outdoor restaurants in Costa Rica bring some bug spray to keep the bugs away. You can find them on FB at Coco’s Mexican Restaurant.

4. Sub Express: This was my kids and hubby’s second most favorite place to eat lunch. They have sub sandwiches and the boys favorite was the Italian sub. Very good and filling sandwiches and wraps. I enjoyed a few of their wraps and was never disappointed. You can also get some lunch meat and cheese to go. It’s pricey because it’s imported from the States but it’s good and worth when trying to feed two teenage boys. You can find them on FB at SubExpress

5. Restaurante Makizu Sámara: We really enjoyed our time here with friends. Kurt and I usually don’t have sushi but our friends do. Kurt had never tried sushi before coming to this place. He tried it and liked it. He ordered the Chicken Adobo and thought it was super amazing . I had Philadelphia rolls and a few bites of the sushi platter in trade for my large serving of Philly rolls. The rest of the table ordered a large sushi platter which was pretty to look at and tasted fabulous. Everyone truly enjoyed their experience. You can find this great restaurant on FB at Makizu Samara.

Honorable mention: Vela Latina, Lo Que Hay, Flying Taco, Pizzeria Paraiso. I’ll cover these restaurants and maybe more in a later post.

Sámara, A Love Letter

Dear Sámara,
I want to tell you how much I’ve enjoyed meeting you. At first I was a little nervous about flying so far to meet someone new. You never know with the internet nowadays. You could have been so pretty and fabulous on a website but horrible in person. I’m glad you are former not the latter. From the first moment I saw you I was in awe of your beauty. Or your warmth. Of the many facets of your personality.
When I first arrived your beauty and laid back nature set me at ease immediately. How can anyone not enjoy your company with such vivid colors and intriguing attributes. In fact, I was amazed that even when we first met you held me with such warmth and grace.
Not to say everything about you is perfect. It’s not but that makes it better. Our first meal together had points of bliss and some uncomfortable points as well. You are gracious host and I appreciate your effort in making me feel at home.
After our initial meeting our relationship began to develop at profoundly comfortable pace. You’d greet me on the mornings with happiness and send me away at night with sweet thoughts. Over the course of the month I began to really begin to see how easy you are to love. Thank you for all your time and effort in this relationship.
Sadly, I have to move on. I truly wish I could stay with you. Life is calling me away. If I didn’t need to earn a living or could figure out how to stay with Sámara I would. Know this, I will return and I don’t expect you to wait for me. I would love to visit you again. I hope we can part as dear sweet friends.

Love always,
Me

Things to Do in Colorado

I have lived in Colorado off and on for nearly twenty years. And yet I’ve not skied in Colorado (Kurt has in Colorado and Italy, lucky guy) or done all the things you do in Colorado. That’s a bit of an exaggeration, I’ve been to a handful of places like Rocky Mountain National Park, Garden of the Gods, Red Rocks, Chautauqua and Roxborough parks, and Guanella Pass. We’ve been to the botanical gardens, Butterfly Pavilion, both zoos, and the aquarium. We’ve definitely done stuff. But there are a few things we would really like to see and experience before we leave the country. And my youngest son has made a list. The list includes Rocky Mountain National Park, Mesa Verde, Sand Dunes, Royal Gorge, Botanical Gardens, Manitou cliff dwellings and Garden of the Gods.

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Garden of the Gods, Rocky Mountain National Park and Roxborough Park. These are places we’ve been before but the boys don’t remember or really want to see again. It’s been years and they haven’t changed but are amazing and a must to see if ever in Colorado.

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Manitou Cliff dwellings, Royal Gorge, Mesa Verde, Four Corners and the Sand Dunes are among the places we like to visit before our departure. These are classically Colorado sights that Kurt hasn’t been to in decades and my boys and I have never seen. Great places to take pictures and have a little adventure.

Outside of Colorado are two places we’d like to squeeze in over a long weekend. Mount Rushmore and Yellowstone National Park. My son would like to see buffalo in their natural habitat. That being said Yellowstone is pretty cool with Old Faithful and all. I was there as a kid and still remember how spectacular the geysers were and how amazing the buffalo and moose were to see roaming around.

So I’m beginning to prepare for our life outside of these United States and planning a few fun things to do before we get out of dodge. So over the next several weeks we’ll be going places and taking lots of pictures. Get out there and do something because it’s a big world.

Ready to rock and roll…Passport to the World

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market

The Camisano Market

One of my favorite memories of my 3 years of childhood in Italy (1983 – 1986), is the famous Sunday market in Camisano, where we lived.  I remember the great foods and clothing for sale and all the people.  One of my biggest memories of the market are the food carts selling bratwurst. Being that bratwurst is a German food, I was surprised how incredible it was.

Camisano farmers market

The Camisano market with definitely be one of the first places I want to visit when we get to Italy.

Do you have any favorite places in Italy? Off the beaten path? Write us in the comments. Give us your opinion. Thanks for reading.

step

One Small Step

One small step for man….

Today we made our first concrete steps (beyond just talking and planning) towards our move abroad to Italy.  So it was a milestone day in that respect.  First, we contacted a couple of TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) schools in Milan.  We also got our passport photos taken and filled out the passport renewal forms.  They are small steps, but it feels good to make some tangible progress.

passports