Tag Archives: life less ordinary

chocolate

Chocolate Coffee Heaven

So you might think that I would’ve found Chocolate Coffee heaven in Costa Rica. After all, that is where the grow some of the best coffee and chocolate. And they do have some awesome coffee and organic chocolate (if you can find it, since most of it seems to be exported.) Alas, I had to wait until I was in central Europe not central America to find chocolate coffee heaven. It is located in a wonderful little place called Choco Cafe U Cervene Zidle (Choco Cafe at the Red Chair, Liliova 4/250, Prague, Czech Republic).
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When I first arrived in Prague a friend of mine from the states informed me she had a friend in Prague that she wanted to introduce me to. This friend is who I refer to in other posts as my favorite transplanted Texan (FTT). She has been in the Czech Republic on and off for about 12 years. After introducing ourselves on line we met in person a few weeks later. (Hubby and I were trying to find a flat, get adjusted to lower fall (not Costa Rica) temperatures, interview for jobs, etc) FTT and I planned on meeting at this pleasant little cafe. It was an adventure for me because I was still getting used to transit in Prague and I hadn’t done a lot of it on my own. I was being a wimp and going with hubby everywhere. This time I met with FTT near a tram stop and took a short walk to the cafe.

She had told me about Choco Cafe briefly and I was fairly excited to: 1. Have some chocolate (I was in dire need of chocolate at the time) 2. Have some coffee or cappuccino or even a straight I.V. of caffeine. 3. Have some girl time. I had been spending a lot of time with my boys and need less testosterone. As we walked a few blocks we talked a little but mostly I was getting to know my surroundings. She explained a few things and one thing I found most interesting was Bethlehem chapel. Jan Hus’ old stomping grounds.

Down the street and around the corner lies a sweet little cafe attached to the U Cervene Zidle Hotel (Red Chair Hotel). We had not made a reservation but lucked out because it was the middle of the afternoon. It still had plenty of patrons. Mothers with small children, couples, students, and ladies like us looking for some chocolate indulgence. Now you could get a regular cappuccino and quiche or you can go crazy.
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I went crazy I ordered the Choco Cafe (chocolate coffee) and the Cokoladovy (chocolate cake). My friend FTT ordered the Choco Cafe and 2 makronky (macaroons). The macaroons are delicious looking. But I needed chocolate fix. And I so got one.

Although I loved this place I didn’t think my husband would be into it. One day, a couple weeks later, I wanted to show him both the cafe and the chapel. So I brought him here because I knew he’d like the choco cafe. He ordered a panini and I got the quiche. Absolutely to die for. You should go here any day of the week, reservations are needed for the busy times. All the popular places take reservations. And whether you need a chocolate caffeine fix or you just want to hang in a pleasant atmosphere with a friend or hubby and enjoy the moment, this is the place.

By the way, they sell chocolate too. Lovely bars of chocolate. Dark, lavender, milk. Fancy. Less fancy.
Choco Cafe

Strange but True (or Crazy Similarities: CR and CZ )

This is a strange but true segment of Chasing Italy. Outside of the obvioius fact that our first two stops are in Costa Rica (CR) and the Czech Republic (CZ because CR was already taken), there are some crazy similarities between the two countries we’ve decided to explore.  Climate is vastly different both in temperature and in the social arena. Costa Rica is laid back, we’ll get there when we get there attitude. Pura Vida. The Czech Republic,  at least in Prague, is as efficient as it can be and a rising star in the world of business. Since the Velvet Revolution in 1989 and the separation of Czech Republic and Slovakia in 1992 business from Europe and North America are coming into Prague. Costa Rica is full of expats and retirees. When you walk in Costa Rica,  you stroll. When you walk in Czech Republic, you stride. Quickly. Making sure to catch the next metro or tram. It’s go, go, go.

Here’s a short list of similarities:

1. No dryers. Okay there are dryers but the majority of households don’t have them. Why? Cost. Energy is expensive. In Costa Rica everyone uses a laundry line on their porch or close by their house. It’s 32 degrees and above year round in most areas of Costa Rica. Why spend money when nature is willing to do the work for free.
In Czech Republic you use drying racks or lines inside or outside, depending on the weather. Some people have lines on their balconies. Some even use a rack that attaches outside their window several stories up. I’m not comfortable having my unmentionables hanging out a window but people do it. Czechs are very efficient and don’t think dryers are a necessity. You get used to it. And you plan accordingly because laundry for four takes time.

2. Mildew. Mildew is bad in CR during the wet or rainy season. It’s no fun to hang out your clothes in the morning and at the end of the day they’re still damp. Damp and warm are mildew best friends. You have to be careful with damp clothes. Don’t leave them on the floor overnight they’ll get nasty fast. Hang it up. Air it out.
I never knew mildew would be an issue in CZ. Some of the older building (and Prague has tons of older buildings) have lousy insulation and air circulation.  I’m specifically talking about the blocks of flats. Huge monstrosities built in mid twentieth century to house the masses. It’s a constant fight in the bathrooms and around the windows. Moisture, moisture, moisture. And since it’s been a warm wet winter and we have an exterior wall we must keep dry and free of mildew. Chlorinated spray is my best friend nowadays. It sucks but it works and it works fast.

3. Dogs. CR has dogs. Lots of them. Generally they are strays and not fixed and randomly reproduce like dogs do. The best dogs we found were in Samara. Very laid back happy dogs for the most part. They roamed relatively freely and yet knew to not enter homes, restaurants,  and most stores. Our neighbors dog liked to follow us and even did some body surfing with us at the beach. (There are free roaming horses as well but that’s a different post). Other dogs in other places in CR were not as well behaved. We often heard stories about people getting attacked and some people taking revenge on the dogs. It’s sad. A lot of expats try and help by adopting dogs and caring for strays with medical care and spaying or neutering. That is awesome of them. Though most Ticos think Americans are crazy for it.
In CZ, there are dogs a plenty. Big ones, little ones. Ones with just collars but well groomed and ones with sweaters which are adorable. I haven’t seen strays though. I’m sure there are some out there. Most dogs are cherished and very obedient.  People walk their dogs off leash a lot of the time. Dogs though not overly friendly but  are very well behaved. Not straying too far from their people and returning when called. People are seen playing fetch and walking them daily. It makes me happy to see happy dogs and the people who love them.

4. Beer. Yes, beer. Beer in CR is cheap and plentiful. Two national beers and under 80 cents a bottle when you turn in your bottles. Yep, you pay extra for bottles but when you bring them in you pay less. They use them over and over. So remember to bring in your bottles and you’ll get a better price.
The micro brewery phenomenon is just getting started in CR. Expats are starting up microbrewery companies and it’s becoming more lucrative to be in the microbrewery business. Since CR is in tourism business it’s good to give them what they want and what they’ll pay for. They have a saying there though “CR where they make easy hard”. Hopefully human ingenuity wins over human greed.
The Czech Republic is largest consumer of beer in the world. Beer is cheaper than soda or water in most restaurants. You still need to turn in your old bottles to get the best price but beer is sold in half liters and for about 65 cents a bottle. Not bad when you like beer. (They have wine too. Don’t dispair.) Most beer consumed is about 4%. People drink a beer with lunch. A beer at lunch is not unheard of and totally normal. People don’t drink to get drunk they just have a beer and go on. It’s just a cultural norm.

5. Discoteques. Both countries have discoteques. For dancing.  If you want to go dancing then you must go to a discoteque not a nightclub like in the U.S. Nightclubs are for drinking and meeting/picking up people. So if you need to get your groove on go to a discoteque in Costa Rica or the Czech Republic.

6. Orchids. Costa Rica is a tropical paradise full of exotic birds, lizards, flowers, etc. I’m told that you can go into the jungle and find orchids. Then sell them for profit. I’m not certain about this but it sounds reasonable.
Praguers love their orchids. They do very well here even with lower temperatures and less light, this far north and in the winter. Must be the moisture. My landlady left one and it’s growing like crazy. About to bloom any day now. Maybe on New Years.
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7. Wrap arounds or Sarongs/Scarves. If you live near the beach in Costa Rica and you’re a woman, you will collect sarongs and you will have coordinating bathing suits, flip flops and sarongs.  A rainbow of colors and designs await you. They make awesome cover ups,  tablecloths, towels, or picnic blankets. If I’d stayed any longer I would have bought more but alas I left for greener pastures.
Those greener pastures are in the center of Europe. Scarves are a necessity is central Europe in the autumn and winter. I have seen the same ability to coordinate scarves, leggings. Prague women love a good scarf. And scarves are awesome. They keep you cosy from wind that comes barreling down metro tunnels or off the river while waiting for your tram . Women collect them to go with outfits and seasons and just cause they’re pretty.
It’s not much of a stretch but women in both countries love their colorful wrap around bits of cloth.
I plan on starting my collection soon. I’ve heard of a shop that’ll give you a great deal of you buy more than one.

8. Music From The 80s And 90s. Costa Rica loves late twentieth century American/British rock and roll. They also love late twentieth century action flicks. And I mean LOVE. On the radio everywhere. Things I haven’t heard for 20 years. It was like reliving my youth but where the roads were questionable and the weather unbearably hot. A bit like August in Nelson county Virginia circa 1990. They also love reggae but that’s a different story.
We’d thought we’d escaped the trip down musical memory lane when we came to Europe. In fact, we’d stepped into a different kind of time warp. Not only do we get to listen late twentieth century rock and roll but additionally get to listen newer uncensored lyrical musings from newer artists. I was flabbergasted when shopping at the market and heard Eminem spouting awesome yet graphic rhymes overhead. Dropping the F bombs left and right. Yet I get to relive my youth with the non sensical musical arrangements of Czech radio. Everything from Four Non Blondes and Michael Jackson to Eminem and Taylor Swift.

9. Chau and Čao. Greetings. One of the first things you learn to say is hello in the local language. When we went to CR we learned and practiced saying Buenos (short for Buenos Dias) or Buena (Buena noches). This is the common greeting in the land of Pura Vida. Once you get to know someone you can use the more familiar and say chau. It’s like the Italian version ciao. There are a lot of Italians on the Pacific side of Costa Rica and this is where chau is used. Coincidence, I think not.
In CZ, specifically Prague (so far that’s all we know of CZ), people greet each all the time. In the hall, the elevator, and in restaurants, bars, and stores. The proper greeting is dobry den. It means good day literally. The same as in Spanish and many other languages. Once you become more familiar or friendly with your new Czech friend you can greet one of two ways. Ahoj or čao. Both are familiar and utilized equally. It’s preference of the speaker. Čao (like its Italian counterpart) be used as in greetings or farewells. Often it’s used as čao čao when saying bye. The first time someone used this with me I felt like I’d been accepted into the in crowd but that’s probably a bit of an exaggeration. There are a lot of Italian influences in Prague from food to coffee. Is the use of čao a coincidence? Hmmm. You decide.

10. Beautiful women. Okay every country has beautiful women. The women of CR and CZ aren’t afraid to own it. Ticas (Costa Rican women) like to wear revealing outfits. After all, it is the beach and swimsuits are revealing but when the go out to discoteques or dinner, also like to wear figure flattering clothes. Sometimes too figure flattering. Low cut tops, short shorts, skin tight jeans, and high heels. Men love this and I appreciate their ability to dress so freely but a little modesty wouldn’t hurt either.
We moved to Prague just as the weather changed to cooler temperatures. This has not stopped the women of Prague from wearing the shortest skirts I have ever seen. In fact, at times I think they seem to be wearing long shirts and not skirts. My least favorite female fashion statement is the winter coat that is longer than the super short skirt. To me it looks like they’re wearing boots, hosiery, and just a coat. (My least favorite male fashion statement is skinny jeans but that’s another post.)
I hear that when warmer temperatures of the spring and summer come, the more cleavage will be shown. I’m sure men can’t wait but personally I can. Not to be a prude but a little modesty goes a long way. Wait, I think I already said that.

11. Shoes off at the door. It’s a necessity in Costa Rica to take off your flip flops before entering your home. Otherwise you will track in sand. Then you will have to deal with the woman of the house. I have threatened dismemberment over tracked in sand so I completely understand.
It’s the cultural norm to remove your shoes when entering a household in the Czech Republic. In fact it is highly frowned upon to leave your shoes. Czechs think it quite rude. I believe that Czechs take pride in their homes whether it’s a flat in a block of flats or something more eclectic. Often you might be offered slippers for walking about the house. Take them or not but please remove your shoes.

So there you have it. The similarities between Costa Rica  and the Czech Republic.  Strange but true.

mind

How Not to Lose Your Fracking Mind (My Family is the A-Team)

In my mind my family are like the characters of the A-Team. Well, sort of. And moving from the States to Costa Rica to Czech Republic with teenagers is not for the faint of heart or the weak of mind. It seems best to approach life with a bit of humor or you will lose your fracking mind. Or at least your patience. Moving in general is a nerve wracking experience. Try getting rid of almost everything, twice.

Give me a minute, I’m good. Give me an hour, I’m great. Give me six months, I’m unstoppable. COL. Hannibal Smith, A-Team. I like the colonel.  In our family my hubby is the colonel. He’s the one with a plan. I’d follow the colonel anywhere. I’ve proven that and will continue to follow him. I trust his abilities.

How Not to Lose Your Fracking Mind While Moving Around the World with Teenagers

1. Save the Legos and other childhood memories. When I was frantically packing and purging I felt like I would lose my mind. There were things I wanted to keep. Boys toys, books, and memories. I was pressed to make decisions fast. Although I had a few months to clear out the clutter nothing really happened until we were down to the wire on time. I had to step it up. I got rid of kitchen things I thought I’d keep. I got rid of clothes we or the boys  might need later. There were a lot of things I might need later. I wouldn’t need them in Costa Rica but everything could fail and I’d need them in the States. I wasn’t trusting in the calling. I was making back up plans. Then, when pressed I decided to keep what was not replaceable. Books, art, memories, kid stuff, and a few heirlooms. I purged like crazy. Got rid of linens, kitchen ware, etc. Etc. Etc. I let it go but I saved the Legos and other childhood memorabilia. One day my children will thank me.

2. Legos Rules but so do handmade gifts and books Those things I couldn’t part with. Quilts my mom made. Art and books that I’d collected. Legos that my son collected. School projects from my kids. I got rid of a lot of fluff but when it came down to it I imagined my grandchildren. I thought about things that I’d want to pass down to them. This made the decision easier. Hopefully I’ll have grandchildren some day and I’ll have things connected to memories to share with them.

I see my oldest son in the role of B.A. Baraccass. B.A. has a good heart but a bad attitude. He follows orders and has a gruff way of expressing himself. My son is a 16 year old grumpy yet lovable walking hormone machine. About 80% of the time his attitude isn’t good. Moody yet vulnerable. Total teenager. One day he’ll come back to me. Normalize I hope.

3. It’s all crap. Okay mostly crap. Seriously you don’t need all those things that are stuffed into corners and forgotten.  Rule of thumb if it’s broken, toss it (or recycle). If it doesn’t fit, give it away. If you don’t use it, give it away. Clutter will wear you out. Clearing out the clutter is more than cleaning it’s liberating. It’s life affirming.  It’s powerful. It’s totally awesome.

My younger son is Mad Dog Murdoch. No he doesn’t suffer from an mental issues like Murdoch but he is kind of crazy but crazy talented. He’s willing to put himself on YouTube and create awesome videos. He’s so creative and yet not quite like the rest of society. He’s handsome, crazy talented, and a little different.

4. Seriously, if you don’t like it or wear it, toss it. You need clothes. Clothes that look good on you and that you feel good about. Everything else can go to someone else. You need cleaning products but you don’t need gallons and gallons. If you don’t use it regularly, don’t buy it. If you clean like a mad woman and go through lots then buy lots. Otherwise buy what you need at the best price and use it. Think twice about purchases. Will you use it? How often? Is it worth it?

Face. The last character in the A-Team. I’m not gorgeous but I do like to talk. I’d say I am the most outgoing talker in our group. The extrovert. Getting myself into trouble by not thinking every through. Face is who you send in to do the talking. Most days that me, able to talk to anyone, anywhere. I don’t lie very well.

In all honesty, my hubby and I switch roles on occasion. Sometimes I’m the leader of the group but sometimes I sport a bad attitude or crazy ideas. So, in a way, we are each the leader, the face, the bad attitude, and the crazy one.

5. Take what you need. Need what you take. Get rid of the superfluous. In the end when you’ve reduced, given away, and gotten rid of things you discover it’s really not about the stuff. People and memories you make with those people are what matters. See and do things with your family and friends. Take pictures and write a blog. Share laughs and love. Make memories.  When you leave this world the memories are what they are left with. Make them good.

What do you think? Could get rid of 90 percent of everything, move across the world, and have an adventure of a lifetime?

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The road less traveled. Will you?

lose

Life, the Universe, And Everything (or How to Lose 300 lbs)

In the past six months a lot of things have changed. Life, the universe, and everything. At least, in our corner of the universe. In fact this is more about the second move and change I had in six months. I did, in fact, lose 300 pounds in a month. Sometimes I look back at the stuff I left behind and I’m relieved. Sometimes I not.

We originally planned on moving to Italy. Then we decided to move to Costa Rica. We got certified, tried to get jobs, and decided to move to Prague. We moved to Prague, got jobs, moved into a flat, and now are beginning our new adventure in Europe.

That being said its been a curious six months. Last April I was in the midst of planning on getting rid of almost everything while working overnights at a department store. And we had begun to prepare mentally to move to Costa Rica for a long while. That meant a plethora of shorts and flip flops. I began to go through everything. Giving away tons of things and selling a few things, and basically reducing our stuff by 90%. That’s a lot of stuff. So much stuff. So little time.

It happened slowly. Week after week.

Hubby didn’t think I could get ‘er done but I did. The fun part started when thepacking began. We had eight checked bags that needed to weigh under 50 lbs each. Sounds easy right? It wasn’t. But it was. All I had to do was make very hard decisions very fast. No problem.

Actually I’m fairly certain I might have started to lose my mind somewhere in the middle of it all. There were things I needed to take, had to take, and wanted to take. And there are things that got packed away in storage that I couldn’t part with like heirlooms, Legos, and books, etc. The pressure to get it right was immense.

I wanted to be prepared. So I bought tubes and tubes of sunscreen, bottles and bottles of bug repellent, quick dry towels, and rain jackets. I packed shorts and bought flip flops.  I brought kitchen stuff and bedding. A few things to make our new home in a new country feel like home. Not to mention home school supplies and books. I didn’t want to be in need of anything for a while. I even bought extra toothpaste and tooth brushes. I had it all planned out.

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Then we decided to move to Europe. And our airline had planned to make my last month in Costa Rica the most interesting and stressful. I needed to lose 300 lbs in three weeks.

Yes, 300 pounds. I needed to lose 300 pounds of stuff. This meant all the extras. Pillows, blankets, and sheets. Books, school supplies, bug spray, and sunscreen. Kitchen supplies and random things that would bring our eight bags to four bags. And 400 pounds down to 196. I got rid of a lot. Some of which was easy and some things I still miss ( a little). I know I’ll be provided for and that things are just things. Things can be replaced. So I decided to grab life by the horns and get rid of almost everything I didn’t feel sad I felt encouraged.

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The biggest issue with moving to Prague in the fall was our clothing. Or lack thereof. The weather had changed and we went from shorts and flip flops in 32° to pants and jackets in 12°. It was a bit of a shock to the system. We bought coats and dressed in layers and mossied on. Our bodies adjusted to both the time difference and the weather and we got down business.
In the first week we secured jobs and began our house hunt.

Finding an apartment was not a simple venture. We’d started in Costa Rica but we’re advised to wait until we arrived and actually saw the apartment before handing over any money. Plus we didn’t really want to pay for an agent. This would cost us extra money we didn’t want to spend.

In the end, after many inquiries and quite a bit looking we found a place. It’s not quite where we’d like to (a.k.a. closer to work). It’s quite an adorable place. It’s mostly furnished and close to transit.

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So we’re are enjoying our new flat and our new life in Prague.

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You Will Be Assimilated (or Acclimating to Life in Prague)

“You will be assimilated. Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be added to our own. Resistance is futile.” Borg, Star Trek universe.
I know my geek is showing. My point is that when moving to a new country it’s important to breath in that culture and not stick out lIke a sore thumb and not act too American. The key is acclimating to life in Prague. Granted,

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if we were purely missionaries going to a land of cannibalistic hedonists we would not try to blend. But as English teachers in Prague looking less like tourists and more like Czechs has its advantages. First though you have to research and observe the differences in dress and mannerisms and begin to acclimate to your new home.
Here’s a list of things I’ve learned and observed in my first few weeks in Prague.

1. Take off your shoes. When entering someone’s home take off your shoes. It’s polite and a good custom as far as I’m concerned. Taking off your shoes keeps the floors cleaner. Most Czechs take pride and great care of their homes. They also don’t need the extra work of cleaning up after dirty feet. When slippers are provided please wear them. That’s why they are there.

2. Boots. It’s autumn and chilly. It’s time to start bundling up and wear your boots. Lovely boots with pants or with skirts. Most are reasonably heeled because of the cobbled streets. Good and sturdy but nice boots. A true necessity in Prague therefore I’ll need to get a pair.

3. Scarves. Scarves are huge here. Literally. Czech love huge scarves. I can see why with damp chilly mornings and evenings. While waiting for the metro or the bus a scarf makes a huge difference in keeping warm. I am looking forward to knitting a great big scarf or three. Until then I’ll make do with make smaller lighter versions that I brought with me.

4. Layers. As in Colorado layering your clothing is necessary. Mornings are chilly but it warms up quite nicely in the afternoon. Being able to bundle up and to remove layers when necessary is just the way to deal with the changing temps.

5. Coaster. When heading to a bar, pub, or restaurant and needing a beer place a coaster in front of you. Sometimes a beer will appear but most often it tells the waiter that you are ordering beer and they ask pilsner or dark or some such defining question. This is Czech custom and utilizing it makes you less touristy.

6. Tipping. To tip like a native you don’t really tip. You round up. If the bill is 713 Kc leave 800. Wait staff make a regular income and don’t  rely on tips like in the States. Hand them your money, say 1000, and ask for the amount you want back, say 200.

7. Read. On the train. On the bus. While waiting. Czechs love to read. This will be difficult for me because I get a bit nauseous if I try to read while moving. I’m sure I can manage to read while waiting though.

8. Quiet. Buses and metros are mostly quiet. Kids and babies make a normal amount of noise. But people in general are reading, listening to music with earbuds, texting, or talking quietly. It’s rather subdued and polite even when crowded at rush hour.

9. Quick. The speed of Prague is taking some getting used to. After 100 days if Pura Vida and the laid back pace of Costa Rica, Prague is quick. Always walking quickly to the bus or the metro or to work or to lunch. As far as I can tell Czechs are timely. A big change from our first 100 days abroad.

10. Survival Czech. Getting the lingo down for Costa Rica was easy. I’d been exposed to Spanish for years. Czech is different. So far I’ve got dobry den (hello) down. I think it’s highly important to learn key phrases when in country. Greetings and basic courtesies to start and learning the streets and metro stops. Being able to order food and drink and go grocery shopping in Czech are basic necessities.

If you try to look less like a  tourist and blend just a little you’ll go far to becoming part of your new world.

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My Favorite Restaurants In Sámara (or Where You Should Eat)

We were in Sámara for a mere month. Our goal was to attend TEFL school to get certified to teach English.  It was an intensive four week course and we passed with flying colors. In our down time on weekends or occasional evenings we would often find ourselves, sometimes with kids and sometimes with new friends, at one of many restaurants in this quaint but quirky little town. Here are my favorite restaurants in Sámara.

1. Bar Arriba: This fun restaurant has the best french fries in Sámara. My kids also enjoyed the chicken strips as well. Although they are family oriented during lunch and dinner it is a fun place to hang out watch a soccer match and have a beer or four. They have a ladies night on Tuesday and often have live music or a DJ to keep it lively. Most of the drinking crowd starts after nine so bringing the kids here for dinner isn’t too chaotic.  The hamburger is the best in town. (Some say the veggie burger at Luv Burger rules but I’m saying as far as beef burgers go, this is the place.) You can find them on FB at Bar Arriba.

2. Falafel Cafe: This was my go to for fast and fresh lunch. In Costa Rica a fast lunch isn’t always possible which is good when you’re on vacation but not when you’ve got a designated hour for lunch. Falafeño or the Tabbouleh plate are excellent choices. Hubby got tired of going here too many times in a row but admitted to it being an awesome little place to get a quick bite. It’s also fairly cheap and filling for this tourist town. You can locate them in the Nature Center part of town. You can find them on FB at Falafel Cafe.

3. Coco’s Mexican: This is a great little place to celebrate with family and friends. They serve typical Mexican fair which, being from Colorado, we crave from time to time. They also serve large margaritas during happy hour. When we finished class at Costa Rica TEFL this was where we went to get our relaxation on. They have happy hour specials like everyone else in town but they have Mexican food and tequila which was a major selling point for the hubby and myself. Kurt really enjoyed the Chimichanga and the Chicken Nachos were excellent. As with all outdoor restaurants in Costa Rica bring some bug spray to keep the bugs away. You can find them on FB at Coco’s Mexican Restaurant.

4. Sub Express: This was my kids and hubby’s second most favorite place to eat lunch. They have sub sandwiches and the boys favorite was the Italian sub. Very good and filling sandwiches and wraps. I enjoyed a few of their wraps and was never disappointed. You can also get some lunch meat and cheese to go. It’s pricey because it’s imported from the States but it’s good and worth when trying to feed two teenage boys. You can find them on FB at SubExpress

5. Restaurante Makizu Sámara: We really enjoyed our time here with friends. Kurt and I usually don’t have sushi but our friends do. Kurt had never tried sushi before coming to this place. He tried it and liked it. He ordered the Chicken Adobo and thought it was super amazing . I had Philadelphia rolls and a few bites of the sushi platter in trade for my large serving of Philly rolls. The rest of the table ordered a large sushi platter which was pretty to look at and tasted fabulous. Everyone truly enjoyed their experience. You can find this great restaurant on FB at Makizu Samara.

Honorable mention: Vela Latina, Lo Que Hay, Flying Taco, Pizzeria Paraiso. I’ll cover these restaurants and maybe more in a later post.

Corporate America Almost Killed Us

Yep it’s true, corporate America almost killed us both but we escaped. When we moved for Kurt’s promotion nearly five years ago we thought that life was swell. (Swell is a term my oldest uses prolifically and sarcastically and I find annoying). More money, new house and new life in North Carolina. In the beginning everything seemed to be going well but as time went on I began to have an eerie feeling. Then one day, nearly two years later, I get a call and the world stopped for a moment. He had been laid off. Oddly enough, that week he had an appointment for an annual check up. His blood pressure was at stroke level. Some seriously concerned nurses started reacting very quickly. Then an another appointment to check his kidneys. They couldn’t figure out why, at his age, his pressure was through the roof so they put him on meds.

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We had to make some serious decisions. Stay or move. What kind of work. He was burnt out on IT and really wanted to do anything else. So we moved back to Colorado and he started driving a truck.

Driving a truck was enjoyable for him but it was hard on family life. So he changed it up again and started back in IT. In customer service. Answering phones. If you’ve ever met my intelligent well mannered husband you’d know he absolutely loathes phone work.

Meanwhile I decided to pitch in some. Little extra money and a discount on Christmas presents never hurts. Actually, it did. I’ve worked long hours before and I’ve done some very physical labor. This was different. During the Christmas season I started working freight for a company that starts with a K and ends with ohls. It first was one or two nights, then three or four. Finally for a few weeks I was working five overnights a week. That’s when I went from not just sleeping through the day to waking up with pain in my arms. As a massage therapist I knew I had to get blood flowing and muscles relaxed to release the pinched nerves in my neck and shoulders. I’d begin wiggling my hands then arms. Doing some self massage on my neck, shoulders, and arms. This would be hilarious because if it was still too early to wake up I’d have my eyes closed trying to remain in that half awake mode.

Then it got worse. My sweet husband noticed my hand was blue. Some stretching and moving around would eventually cause it to return to normal. I’d noticed that when I worked three nights in a row this would happen. But sometimes three nights in a row would be the only work I’d get for the week. So I continued on with a little complaining on the side.

Hating his job but willing to do it because it’s a job and pays money. It’s not that good of a job. It’s not that good of pay. Then we got an out. A possibility of a new life in a new country. A possibility of Pura Vida.

More relaxed way of life is a small yet significant reason we decided to move to Costa Rica. He wants to be more laid back and I’m totally there already. Stress has a way of making decisions for you. When life becomes too stressful, action needs to be taken.  If we continue on this path our bodies would give us even larger indicators of the need for change and we both didn’t want any more health issues.

So we’re moving to Costa Rica in search of Pura Vida. And we’ll continue to dream about Italy and plan our future adventure together. I’m hoping that we’re successful in our endeavors of teaching English and that we can relax more, eat healthier, and enjoy each other for a long time. After all, we are barely in our forties and we have so much life to live, adventures to have, and experiences yet to be.

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Took the Leap and Haven’t Fallen

We took a leap of faith and moved to Costa Rica. We are still chasing Italy and we’ve made the first step in our journey. We got out of dodge, took a leap and landed in Costa Rica, a new life. We’ve been here a whole 24 hours. Tomorrow TEFL school starts for both of us. I’m a bit nervous but who wouldn’t be if they were in my sandals. The apartment we rented for the month is not luxurious by normal American standards but it’s  safe, clean, and has everything we need including Wi-Fi. We’re about a kilometer from the beach. At the beach the water is warm but it’s glorious. I’m told there’s a reef that blocks the larger animals (read sharks) from coming in to visit. This makes me happy. Might even learn to surf while I’m here.
After going to a few restaurants that were owned by English speakers we decided to head to the supermercado. It wasn’t a bad experience. Pali is a chain and they had a little bit of everything. We got a few necessities and went our merry little way. Actually we got about as much as we could carry comfortably back to the house. I did forget salt. We’ll be making a return trip today for that and probably some cold beer.
The heat is incredible. 34 degrees Celsius with a even higher heat index. For those who don’t think in Celsius, it was 98 degrees with 109 degree heat index. And it needs to rain. Currently there’s a dry spell and very little break in the heat. You hear thunder and see lightning but no rain. I hope it does rain some because a drought is no bueno.

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So today we’ll get on our swimsuits and get wet. Then we’ll have dinner and shower to cool off. Luckily we have fans to keep us from melting.
What’s holding you back? What’s your leap of faith?

Things to Do in Colorado

I have lived in Colorado off and on for nearly twenty years. And yet I’ve not skied in Colorado (Kurt has in Colorado and Italy, lucky guy) or done all the things you do in Colorado. That’s a bit of an exaggeration, I’ve been to a handful of places like Rocky Mountain National Park, Garden of the Gods, Red Rocks, Chautauqua and Roxborough parks, and Guanella Pass. We’ve been to the botanical gardens, Butterfly Pavilion, both zoos, and the aquarium. We’ve definitely done stuff. But there are a few things we would really like to see and experience before we leave the country. And my youngest son has made a list. The list includes Rocky Mountain National Park, Mesa Verde, Sand Dunes, Royal Gorge, Botanical Gardens, Manitou cliff dwellings and Garden of the Gods.

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Garden of the Gods, Rocky Mountain National Park and Roxborough Park. These are places we’ve been before but the boys don’t remember or really want to see again. It’s been years and they haven’t changed but are amazing and a must to see if ever in Colorado.

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Manitou Cliff dwellings, Royal Gorge, Mesa Verde, Four Corners and the Sand Dunes are among the places we like to visit before our departure. These are classically Colorado sights that Kurt hasn’t been to in decades and my boys and I have never seen. Great places to take pictures and have a little adventure.

Outside of Colorado are two places we’d like to squeeze in over a long weekend. Mount Rushmore and Yellowstone National Park. My son would like to see buffalo in their natural habitat. That being said Yellowstone is pretty cool with Old Faithful and all. I was there as a kid and still remember how spectacular the geysers were and how amazing the buffalo and moose were to see roaming around.

So I’m beginning to prepare for our life outside of these United States and planning a few fun things to do before we get out of dodge. So over the next several weeks we’ll be going places and taking lots of pictures. Get out there and do something because it’s a big world.

Shoot for the Moon (Chasing Italy Does)

The-Thinker

Sometimes you need to shoot for the moon.

So about six weeks ago my husband started freaking out. (Visualize the Thinker). Which, in turn, caused me to freak out. (Visualize cartoon Tasmanian devil). My anxiety aside, Kurt freaks out so quietly that I find it completely unnerving. He ponders and frets and keeps to himself. Being a natural introvert this is how he deals. But to me, not introverted at all, I begin to wig and wig hard. I become an annoying little bird, jumpy and trying to figure out what’s wrong, what can I do to fix it, or what did I do. I’m not a quiet patient wife. I fret and I try not to nag.

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After about three days and a bunch of forwarded emails with links to getting visas and jobs in Italy he finally broke his silence. He was concerned about Italy. Concerned that we’d be setting ourselves up for failure by leaping head first into our adventure. A multitude of blogs and websites say that though not impossible, it’s difficult to start ESL teaching in Italy. That experience is what we need and we can’t afford to adventure into the unknown willy nilly like. Our little bit of money would go much further, while we get experience, in a different country.

Knowing that we were not going to give up this dream of traveling and of Italy, we began to discuss options. What countries? What continents? What would be acceptable and reasonable and what wouldn’t be acceptable? Kurt threw out the idea of South America. Possible. He’d been there ten years ago on the Amazon river on a missions trip. I threw out Asia and Kurt cited a few reasons why he’d rather not. Not possible. Among them the cuisine and the Asian work versus play lifestyle. We wanted to not have to work a ‘regular’ job in a foreign country but to work some , explore some, travel some, and blog about everything in between. Plus we have teenagers and we want them to experience as much culture as they can between their studies and our work. Family time is quite important. So Asia is more or less off the table. Europe is on hold. For some reason we’ve never discussed Africa. So we started looking at central and south America.

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Out of the blue I suggested Costa Rica. Not sure why. I didn’t know much about it outside of ecotourism. I even had to check a map to see where exactly it was located. I felt rather blonde as I discovered that it was actually just north of the country I was born in. But then again I was born in Panama but left at six months of age. I’ve always wanted to see the place of my birth maybe now I’ll get a chance.

Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars.
Norman Vincent Peale

So Chasing Italy will shoot for the moon. It might take a while but it’ll be an adventure.

Where is your ‘shoot for the moon’ place? Italy? Europe? Asia? Australia? Tell us in the comments below.